Why the ‘Save the Bros’ Viral Ad Campaign Misunderstands the Nature of Bro-Ness

Organic Valley looks to make hay by tackling America’s most misunderstood demographic.
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Organic Valley looks to make hay by tackling America’s most misunderstood demographic.
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Advertising can be a cynical business, especially in the age of YouTube embeds (see below), but the latest ploy from the dairy pushers at Organic Valley seems especially cynical in tone and intent. The advertisement implies that “bros,” which it shows as muscle-bound, hairless, flat-brimmed buffoons, may be under threat if they continue to pound protein shakes. The name of the bit, “Save the Bros,” is catchy and it has already started getting passed around the internet by people who aren’t me, but it disingenuously conflates meatheads and gym rats with Bros in order to benefit from a tired buzzword. 

Say what you will about Bro-culture, but it isn’t defined by the gym or by chest shaving. To the contrary, most Bros are not talking about the gym when they claim to be crushing it. Most Bros don’t drink protein shakes and won’t die out if there is a chemical-facilitated “Bro colony collapse.” They’ll be safe because they’ll be on Tinder dates or staying late at the office or, yes, doing yoga.

What the ad, which makes a joke about Bros in downward dog, fails to understand about hyper-mainstream culture, which is assured what bro-ness embodies, is that it evolves incredibly fast. Yesterday’s Bros were focused on bulk, not flexibility, but times change and what women want changes and you don’t see as many crucifix tattoos at the gym as you used to. Organic Valley isn’t really trying to save anyone, they’re trying to push the Bros back to where they once belonged. 

Shame on you Organic Valley. You broke the Bro Code.