Aston Martin Is Sending Off The Vanquish S In Style With This Jet-Fighter Inspired, Limited Edition Beauty

Absolute perfection.
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Absolute perfection.
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The Royal Air Force flies a "Blue Angels"-like aerobatic team called the "Red Arrows," and Aston Martin is paying tribute to the team with a limited-edition Vanquish S Red Arrows car.

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Aston will build only ten of these crimson beauties, each personalized to unique specifications with hand-crafted interiors and graphic elements that draw on the visual language of aviation.

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The Vanquish S Red Arrows is positioned as the ultimate version of the car, its high-water mark as the Vanquish wraps up its production run. 

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That dramatic paint hue is named Eclat Red, reflecting the shade used on the Red Arrows' planes and the team's "eclat" motto.

The cars' bare carbon fibre roof panel includes an inlaid ‘charge’ pattern mimicking the canopy design of a jet fighter, with Union Jack enamel fender badges and a titanium exhaust complete the exterior details.

Inside, Red Arrows and RAF inspired details are used throughout, such as the Pinewood green inserts that evoke the design of the classic RAF flight suit and Martin Baker Ejection Seat fabric, together with the green webbing seatbelts. 

The Vanquish S Red Arrows cars also get an Aston Martin One-77-inspired steering wheel.

In addition to the cars themselves, customers also receive accessories such as racing helmets, racing suits, bomber jackets and a Vanquish S fitted luggage set, a highly-detailed 1:18 scale model of their car and another model of the Red Arrows' Hawk aircraft. A specially designed car cover and build book of photos documenting construction of their car are also included. 

While the U.S. imitates Britain by copying things like "America's Got Talent," in case of military aerobatics the Brits followed our example, launching the Red Arrows in 1965. The U.S. Navy began the Blue Angels team in 1946, and the Air Force Thunderbirds team started in 1953, though it had an unnamed aerobatic team before that.