One Company is Designing Shotgun Ammo Just for Shooting Drones

People are taking up arms to protect their privacy.
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People are taking up arms to protect their privacy.
Drone Munition don't shoot

Drones are a funroute to relatively safe adventure, but detractors of the personal drone revolution have inspired a group of gun dealers to join the fray. Snake River Shooting Products, an outfit hawking a product called Drone Munition, keeps warriors dreading the "Drone Apocalypse" ready for when the time comes.

Drone Munition, according to the ad copy on Snake River's website, "generates a discussion on the growing drone market in general." It goes on to say that self defense "applies whether it is a person based or machine based threat and is just as important as protecting your family." Drone Munition is "a cost effective way to do just that."

RT reports that the shotgun shells are "3-inches long and are full of #2 steel shot" and manufacturers state they are continually improving the product; in the future they expect to eventually develop "electronic defeating loads" and an "extended range platform."

Even though you're equipped, don't go sport-hunting for flying robots anytime soon. Blowing drones out of the sky may be a crime. A Kentucky man was arrested in July and charged with criminal mischief and "wanton endangerment" for blasting a drone he claimed was spying on his daughters.

Drone-makers may be ahead of munitions manufacturers anyway. An outfit called Game of Drones built a hard-to-kill prototype quadcopter almost 3 years ago and demonstrated just how tough it was to take down in a video (watch below) — their prototype survived collisions, fire and shotgun blasts and kept on buzzing.

If the personal drone revolution is real, maybe it's natural that the revolution inspires a little bit of warfare.

Photos by Fabrice Coffrini/AFP