New Smart Mattress Can Catch Cheaters In The Act - Maxim

New Smart Mattress Can Catch Cheaters In The Act

Who's bouncing those springs when you're gone?
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Couple in bed generic Getty

Just friends. (Photo: Malin Karlsson / Getty)

If you've ever had a sneaking feeling that something is going on in your bedroom when you're not there, technology has caught up with your paranoia. It's called the Smarttress, and it's literally a smart mattress that when synchronized with an app can tell you if someone is knocking boots in your bed and you're not even home to join in the fun. 

Spanish manufacturer Durmet calls the mattress's sensors a "lover detection system" and claims it will be "the very first mattress that makes your body relax by night and your mind by day, when you're not at home." 

In an amusingly over-the-top and confusingly erotic video introducing the product, Durmet links the need for the Smarttress to the Ashley Madison Hack and claims there is a "global infidelity crisis." It details how sensors are embedded in the springs and how they can talk to an app. To bypass innocent mattress usage like kids using their parents' bed as an impromptu trampoline, Smarttress will transmit details to the app like the intensity and frequency of mattress impact as well as pressure points hit by mattress, er, users. Check it out below:

As reported the Guardian, the Smarttress is just one in a series of products offered to assist in outing cheaters. Many are simply apps that monitor actions such as a partner's Tinder use and not a pricy spy mattress. 

Innovation is growing on the cheating side, too — the Guardian used an app named Wiper for an example of philanderer-friendly tech.  Wiper reportedly permits users to privately text and call — then if they fear those texts and calls will lead to trouble, they can delete exchanges with others from both users' phones as well as servers where they were stores, all with the touch of a button. 

It's a little nerve-wracking to have these products available since their very existence implies there's a whole lot of cheating going on between everyone, everywhere. Still, in a world where physicians in one major western country are concerned about a "super gonorrhea" wreaking havoc with genitalia across the nation, better safe than sorry.

h/t Guardian