Get Down and Dirty With This Fat-Tired Ducati Scrambler - Maxim

Get Down and Dirty With This Fat-Tired Ducati Scrambler

Leave the road behind and hit the dirt with this Ducati from Down & Out.
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Photo: Simon Krajnyak via Down & Out Cafe Racers

Photo: Simon Krajnyak via Down & Out Cafe Racers

Steve McQueen's fence-jumping heroics in The Great Escape popularized the Triumph scrambler. It also inspired the wizards at Yorkshire, England's Down & Out Cafe Racers to settle on a Ducati for this chunky fat-tire off-road build.

Photo: Simon Krajnyak via Down & Out Cafe Racers

Photo: Simon Krajnyak via Down & Out Cafe Racers

Too many bike tuners simply bolt on off-the-shelf parts ordered from catalogs. But D&O makes many components, and they used those liberally in building this 2015 Ducati Scrambler. Check out D&O's own leather seat (with matching hand grips), side panels, handlebar risers, turn signals, headlight, small front fender and 18-inch spoked wheels.

Photo: Simon Krajnyak via Down & Out Cafe Racers

Photo: Simon Krajnyak via Down & Out Cafe Racers

Down & Out turned to Fastec Custom Racing for the wider triple clamps (needed to fit the fat new tires), speedometer mount and wheel spacers. Rizoma provided a new airbox cover, cam belt cover, master cylinder covers, sprocket cover and chain guard.

Photo: Simon Krajnyak via Down & Out Cafe Racers

Photo: Simon Krajnyak via Down & Out Cafe Racers

An Ohlins shock absorber controls the rear suspension, and D&O installed frame plugs and an engine sump protector from the Ducati parts catalog.

Photo: Simon Krajnyak via Down & Out Cafe Racers

Photo: Simon Krajnyak via Down & Out Cafe Racers

With the hardware all in place, ProKustom shot the scrambler's paint and Demon Speedshop provided the graphics.

Photo: Simon Krajnyak via Down & Out Cafe Racers

Photo: Simon Krajnyak via Down & Out Cafe Racers

If you like the Scramblers' can-do nature, Down & Out can sell you the parts they created to build the bike. They avoided radical frame alterations so customers can make similar modifications themselves. “We were going to cut the rear end of the bike,” founder Shaun Walker told BikeExif.com, “but in the end we wanted to avoid chopping it up—so we can make parts for others to achieve the same look.”

h/t: Bike Exif