This Amphibious Motorcycle Turns Into a Jet Ski Once It Hits the Water

It would make James Bond drool.
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It would make James Bond drool.
(Photo: Gibbs Amphibians)

(Photo: Gibbs Amphibians)

We've all been there: You've just pulled off a diamond heist and are absconding with the goods on your motorcycle when—dammit!—you hit a large body of water. The police are hot on your trail, and it's too late to turn back.

Alan Gibbs, an enterpreneur from New Zealand, knows this all-too-common struggle and has the solution: the Biski, a motorcycle that turns into a jet ski at the push of a button.

(Photo: gibbs amphibians)

(Photo: gibbs amphibians)

Thanks to his company Gibbs Amphibians, which develops "amphibious vehicles," you will never have to let a pond, lake or even ocean (okay, maybe not ocean...) stop you from pulling of the diamond burglary of the millennium. 

(Photo: gibbs amphibians)

(Photo: gibbs amphibians)

Gibbs Amphibians has the rundown on this incredible feat of aquatic engineering:

The Biski is truly unique; as a single seat (or single plus pillion), twin jet, HSA Motorcycle, it is a world’s first in many ways. At just 2.3m long and under 1m wide, it is the smallest of all Gibbs High speed amphibious platforms, and very probably the most technically advanced. It represents true freedom for the individual; serious fun.

(Photo: gibbs amphibians)

(Photo: gibbs amphibians)

See it in motion in the video, below. 

The Biski takes just five seconds for its wheels to retract and then switch over to jet propulsion. With the right timing, you can drive directly into to the water even when going full-speed.

(Photo: gibbs amphibians)

(Photo: gibbs amphibians)

This 500-pound solo vehicle had reach speeds of 80 miles per hour on land and can forge ahead at 37 miler per hours in the water. Most jet skis will reach up to around 60 miles per hour so you will have to sacrifice some velocity.

(Photo: gibbs amphibians)

(Photo: gibbs amphibians)

Check out all the devilish details on the Gibbs Amphibians website.

Check out some more of its amphibious creations, below.

h/t designboom